• Link to syllabus or read below                                                                                    

     

     

                                                                                                  Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory 

     

    This course is a college level music theory course covering both written theory and ear-training.  This class will include fundamentals of music theory, part-writing, analysis, dictation, and sight-singing.  This course is designed to prepare the each student for the Advanced Placement exam in Music Theory. 

     

    EVERY WEEK with few exceptions will include the following activities:

    • Sight-singing
    • Dictation (harmonic and melodic)
    • Written theory including aural analysis
    • Friday will conclude with a quiz

     

    MATERIALS:

    Each student should have a three-ring binder with dividers, containing lined notebook paper, manuscript paper, pencils, and erasers.  Students may find a thumb drive or portable hard drive useful for saving files, projects, and compositions. Students should bring earbuds/headphones to each class if possible. There are few loaner headphones for aural practice in the lab.

    Note: There is an * $89.00 fee for the AP Exam. It will be automatically charged to the student’s account. (* this amount reflects current pricing)

     

    TEXTBOOK AND RESOURCES: 

    “The Practice of Harmony” by Peter Spencer will serve as the primary text. The following resources will also be used:

     

         Written Theory:

     

    Clendinning,Jane and Elizabeth Marvin. The Musician’s Guide to Theory and Analysis Workbook, 2nd ed. New York - London: Norton, 2011.

     

    Finn, Ben & Jonathan. Sibelius 8.0, UK: Avid Technology. 2006. (available in Midi lab)

     

    Scoggin, Nancy. AP Music Theory. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s 2010.

     

    Spencer, Peter. The Practice of Harmony, 5th ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2003.

     

    Practica Musica 5.0, Redmond Wa: Ars Nova Software LLC., 2007 (available in Midi lab)

     

         Music Analysis and Study: (component 19)

     

    Clendinning,Jane and Elizabeth Marvin. The Musician’s Guide to Theory and Analysis Anthology, 2nd ed. New York - London: Norton, 2011. 

     

    Palisca, Claude V. ed.  Norton Anthology of Western Music, Vol. 1 & 2, 4th ed. Ny,Ny:  W.W. Norton & Co, 2001. 

     

    Sterling, Jennifer. InForm Music analysis Software, Champaign, IL: Electronic Courseware Systems, Inc. 2004.

     

         Aural Skills: 

    Durham, Thomas. Beginning Tonal Dictation, Prospect Heights, Il:

     Waveland Press, Inc. 

     

    Palmer, Nicholas. Steps to Harmony, vol. 1-5. 2nd ed. Olympia, Wa: Masterworks Press, 

    * Sight- singing materials organized by level of difficulty.  

    Web Resources:

    www.musictheory.net Drill and practice guide

    www.teoria.com great tutorials, and dictation exercises. Also a mobile app

     

    EXPECTATIONS:

     

    1. Students will participate in all classroom discussions and activities.
    2. Students will complete all assigned exercises and readings.
    3. Students will keep and maintain a music theory notebook for class notes, handouts, assignments and listening logs.
    4. Students will study released AP Exams and take practice tests to prepare for the exam.
    5. Students will listen to a minimum of 1 hour of music outside of class and maintain a music listening log consisting of a written analysis/evaluation of each listening section describing the following items: (component 19, listening is pulled from student interest and Norton by major music era)
      1. Melody (conjunct/disjunct)
      2. Harmonic characteristics (harmonic idioms present)
      3. Rhythm (straight/syncopated)
      4. Texture (monophonic, homophonic, polyphonic, heterophonic)
      5. Timbre (instrumentation, tone color)
      6. Dynamics (dynamic contrast)
      7. Tempo (tempo changes)
      8. Meter (duple/triple, simple/compound, regular/irregular)
      9. Mode (major, minor, modal, atonal)
      10. Form ( binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, etc.)
      11. Articulation (legato, staccato, etc.)

     

    1. Students will submit compositions based on assigned form and content. Other minor compositions will be required to demonstrate understanding and synthesis of concepts presented.  These compositions may include:
      1. A song in binary form
      2. A song in ternary form
      3. A song in sonata form
      4. A song based on a major mode
      5. A song based on a minor mode
      6. A song using two-part counterpoint
      7. A song using three-part counterpoint
      8. A Song that modulates from one tonal center to another through use of a pivot chord
      9. A song based on a church mode

     

    GRADING: 

     

    Weekly quizzes (given on Fridays) 20%

    Chapter assignments 30%

    Compositions/class projects 25%

    Mid-term and Final exams 25%

     

    Student success in this class is directly linked to the timely completion of class assignments that prepare the student for the weekly quizzes, and a large amount of study and personal practice. Additional music lab time outside of classes may be scheduled by students as needed. 

     

    In order to experience success on the Advanced Placement Exam, students must develop skills in both the aural and written components of music theory. 

    The overall goal of the class will be to master the following tasks:

     

    1. Fundamental Terminology and Notational Skills: 

     

    • Notate and identify pitch in four clefs: treble, bass, alto, and tenor. 
    • Notate, hear, and identify simple and compound meters. 
    • Notate and identify all major and minor key signatures. 
    • Notate, hear, and identify the following scales: chromatic, major, and the three forms of the minor. 
    • Name and recognize scale degree terms, e.g., tonic, supertonic, etc. 
    • Notate, hear, and transpose the following modes: Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, and Mixolydian (authentic forms only). 
    • Notate, hear, and identify whole tone and pentatonic scales. (component 7)
    • Notate, hear, and identify all major, minor, diminished, and augmented intervals inclusive of an octave. 
    • Notate, hear, and identify triads including inversions. 
    • Define and identify common tempo and expression markings. 

     

    1. Compositional Skills: 

     

    • Compose a bass line for a given melody to create simple two-part counterpoint in seventeenth- and/or eighteenth-century style; analyze the implied harmonies. 
    • Realize a figured bass according to the rules of eighteenth-century chorale style, major or minor key, using any or all of the following devices: diatonic triads and seventh chords, inversions, nonharmonic tones, and secondary-dominant and dominant seventh chords. 
    • Realize a four-part chorale-style progression from Roman and Arabic numerals. 

     

    III. Score Analysis: 

     

    • Notate, hear, and identify authentic, plagal, half, Phrygian half, and deceptive cadences in major and minor keys. 
    • Identify in score the following nonharmonic tones: passing tone (accented and unaccented), neighboring tone, anticipation, suspension, retardation, appoggiatura, escape tone, changing tone (cambiata), and pedal tone. 
    • Small-scale and large-scale harmonic procedures, including: identification of cadence types 
    • Roman-numeral and figured-bass analysis, including nonharmonic tones, seventh chords, and secondary-dominant chords 
    • identification of key centers and key relationships; recognition of modulation to closely related keys 
    • Melodic organization and developmental procedures: scale types; modes, melodic patterning motivic development and relationships (e.g., inversion, retrograde, sequence, imitation) 
    • Rhythmic/metric organization: meter type (e.g., duple, triple, quadruple) and beat type (e.g., simple, compound) 
    • rhythmic devices and procedures (e.g., augmentation, diminution, hemiola) 
    • Texture: types (e.g., monophony, homophony, polyphony) 
    • devices (e.g., textural inversion, imitation) 
    • NOTE: Scores for analysis may include two-stave piano scores, single-voice melodies, solo voice with piano accompaniment, and trio or quartet scores written at concert pitch, which may include an alto or tenor clef line. 

     

    1. Aural Skills: 

     

    • Detect pitch and rhythm errors in written music from given aural excerpts. 
    • Notate a melody from dictation, 8 bars, MAJOR key, mostly diatonic pitches, simple and compound time, treble and bass clef, in 3 to 4 playings. 
    • Notate a melody from dictation, 8 bars, MINOR key, chromatic alteration from harmonic/melodic scales, simple and compound time, treble and bass clef, in 3 to 4 playings. 
    • Sight sing a melody, 8 bars long, major and minor key, duple and triple meter, simple and compound time, in treble and bass clef, using solfege, pitch names, numbers, or any comfortable vocal syllable(s). 
    • Hear the following non-harmonic tones: passing tone (accented and unaccented), neighboring tone, anticipation, suspension, retardation, appoggiatura, escape tone, changing tone, and pedal tone. 
    • Notate the soprano and bass pitches and Roman and Arabic numeral analysis of a harmonic dictation, in eighteenth-century chorale style. Features may include seventh chords, secondary dominants, major or minor key, in 3 to 4 playings. 
    • Identify processes and materials in the context of music literature representing a broad spectrum of genres, media, and styles: 
    • melodic organization (e.g., scale-degree function of specified tones, scale types, mode, melodic patterning, sequences, motivic development) 
    • harmonic organization (e.g., chord function, inversion, quality) 
    • tonal organization (e.g., cadence types, key relationships) 
    • meter and rhythmic patterns 
    • instrumentation (i.e., identification of timbre) 
    • texture (e.g., number and position of voices, amount of independence, presence of imitation, density) 
    • formal procedures (e.g., 8 measure Classical phrases including antecedent and consequent structure (component 13); distinctions among literal repetition, varied repetition, and contrast; small forms) 
    • NOTE: Most examples are drawn from the standard repertoire of Western art music. Each exam will also include some representation of jazz, popular, vernacular, or world music outside of the Western tradition.

     

    Course Outline

     

    All topics include written and aural exercises. Chapter assignments refer to text, “The Practice of Harmony” by Peter Spencer, unless otherwise noted.

    Week 1, Aug 26

    Review summer assignment and concepts (clefs, key signatures, scales) summer skills review

     (chapters 1, 2, 3, summer handout packet, fundamentals quiz)

     

    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 3
    • Mathematics Number and Quantity Standard HS.N.MP.2

     

     

    Week 2, Sep 2

    Aural skills pre-test, rhythmic sight-singing, scale formulas, forms of minor, circle of 5ths, intervals and inversion, enharmonic intervals, summer skills quiz 

      • (aural unit Scoggins; aural unit quiz)
      • (chapter 4 - intervals, Spencer)

     

    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 4
    • Mathematics Number and Quantity Standard HS.N.MP.2

     

     

    Week 3, Sep 9

    Melodic sight-singing, intervals and inversion, enharmonic intervals, melodic and harmonic dictation, basic harmonic progressions and triads, Sibelius primer. 

     

    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 10

     

     

    Weeks 4, Sep 16  

    Triads, Triad quiz, interval review, four part writing

    (chapter 5, 7)

     

    Week 5, Sep 23

    Quiz on intro to 4 part, ch 8 primary triads in root position, aural skills Barron quiz Friday 

     

    Week 6, Sep 30  

    Quizlet on terms, Triads in Major and minor

    (chapter 7, 8 – triads and four-part writing primary triads root position, four part vocal writing and primary triads in root position, aural dictation, figured bass – Clendinning and Marvin assignment 13.2-13.6) (component 3)

     

    • Mathematics Geometry Standard HS.G.MP.7
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1

     

    Weeks 7-11, Oct 7, Oct 14, Oct 21, Oct 28 , Nov 4

    Mid-term – 4 part composition, first inversion triads and harmonization, second inversion triads and uses, secondary triads and inversions, triad use order, score analysis

    (chapter 9, 10, 11, 12 – first inv. triads, harmonization of melodies I)

     

    • Mathematics Geometry Standard HS.G.MP.7
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1

     

     

    Weeks 12 Nov 11

    Dominant seventh chords and uses, inversions, resolutions

    (chapter 15 – second inv. triads, secondary triads; Harmonic organization II – Scoggin, figured bass – Clendinning and Marvin assignment 14.1-14.5, 15.5) (component 3)

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8

     

     

    Week 13 Nov 18

    HW review, NCT, quiz/quizlet

     

    Thanksgiving Break

     

    Week 14 Dec 2

    Quiz review and NCT II, ch 16, ch 14 hw, chorale composition, perform

    Harmonizing below soprano, non chord tones, non chord tones 2, chorale composition assignment

    (chapter 13, 14, 16 – Non-chord tones I, Harmonization of melodies II)

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1

     

     

    Weeks 15-16, Dec 9, Dec 16

    writing for the piano solo composition

    (chapter 17 - writing for the piano)

     

    Winter Break

    Week 17-18, Jan 7, Jan 13

    Secondary dominants, group study guide and game project 

    (chapter 18– secondary dominants)

     

    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 4
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 10

     

     

    Week 19, Jan 20

    Group project and game presentations, finals

     

    Week 20, Jan 27

    Review final, secondary diminished chords, chapter 12, round two of quizlet

    Friday p 283 Barron quiz review - quizlet round 2

    (chapter 19 , secondary diminished chords)

    Week 21, Feb 3

    Rhythm notation and meter, completion of cadence Barron, rhythm packet

    (chapter 6, notation of rhythm)

     

     

    Week 22-23, Feb 10, Feb 17

    Barron quiz/Modulation - common chord, abrupt and enharmonic modulation, pedal point, use of modulation in analysis, project assigned

    (chapter 23, 24, 25 – pedal point, common chord, abrupt and enharmonic)

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Mathematics Geometry Standard HS.G.MP.7
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1

     

     

    Week 24-25, Feb 24, Mar 2

    Forms in music, recognizing forms aurally and visually and analyzing/defining motivic treatment (component 6), FRQ 7 harm below sop

    Music analysis and listening from “The Musician’s Guide Anthology” - Clenndinning

    InForm Music Analysis projects 

     

    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1

     

     

    Week 26, Mar 9

    Modes: relationships and uses

    (chapter 28 modal harmony)

     

    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standard 10

     

     

    Week 27, Mar 16

    Practice Exam, terms and vocab presentations 

    1998 practice exam, M not so sure terms. F term quiz

     

    Spring Break

     

    Week 25, Apr 1

    Review AP Exam Section One 

    Terms and vocab review

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standards 3,4,10

     

    continued 1998 AP and then aural skills

     

    Week 26, Apr 6

    Review AP Exam Section two 

    Terms and vocab review

    Aural error detection

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standards 3,4,10

     

    practice test 1 Barron

     

    Week 27, Apr 13

    Practice test, Free Response 1 & 2 review 

    Terms and vocab review

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standards 3,4,10

     

     

    Week 28, 29, Apr 20, Apr 27

    Practice test, Free Response 3 & 4 review 

    Terms and vocab review

     

    • Mathematics Functions Standard HS.F.MP.7 & 8
    • Writing Anchor Standard 1
    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Reading for Literacy Anchor Standards 3,4,10

     

     

    Week 30, May 4

    Practice test, Free Response 5 review 

    Terms and vocab review

    Sight-singing review

     

    • Speaking and Listening Anchor Standard 1
    • Mathematics Algebra Standard HS.A.MP.5,6

     

    Week 31, May 11

    Final review, AP EXAM Wednesday May 13

     

    Week 32, May 18

    Debrief and Q&A 

     

    Weeks 33-34, May 25, June 1

    20th century compositions, FINALS

     

    • Writing Anchor Standard 1