• Clackamas River Basin Council Provides Environmental Science Experience for WLWV Students

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 9/9/2019 9:00:00 AM

    West Linn High School students study local organisms. The West Linn-Wilsonville Internship Pathways Program launched this summer, connecting WLWV high school students to career-based learning opportunities in the local community. One such work-based opportunity came through the Clackamas River Basin, whose collaboration has allowed two students to gain first-hand environmental science experience this summer.

    West Linn High School students Gavin Harvey and Camden Saks spent their summer working in different areas of the Clackamas River Basin. Working alongside CBRC’s Suzi Cloutier, Gavin and Camden regularly visited water sites to learn about the Clackamas River Basin Council’s role in preserving the watershed for future generations. There, the pair would test samples from various sites on the Clackamas River, record observations of surrounding wildlife, and help staff with regular reports.

    “Our goal for students is to get a little taste of just one sliver of environmental science,” Suzi said of the internship program. “There are so many areas of environmental science where people can make a positive impact, and seeing that first-hand will hopefully go a long way.”

    Students regularly tested for more than 120 different pesticides, monitoring key spawning areas across the area. They also learned about restoration and preservation efforts, including the planting of native trees and plants and the importance of protecting local watersheds.

    In addition to weekly trips into nature, students in the Internship Pathway program also completed a variety of assignments during their summer work experience, including mentor interviews, writing tasks, résumé building, and more. Camden credited his CBRC mentors for a summer of meaningful learning.

    “The real-world experience is really helpful and interesting,” he said.

    Gavin said the internship experience furthered his interest in environmental science as a career possibility down the road.

    “I’ve always been interested in the idea of environmental sustainability and this experience has allowed me to explore a potential career,” he said. “I’m interested in a career in environmental engineering and this experience has given me some great insight.”

    The CRBC also hosted Wilsonville High School Senior Ally Finkbeiner as a digital marketing intern this summer. Mentored by CRBC Communications and Program Coordinator Pat Kaczmarek, Ally helped create a social media marketing plan aimed at increasing youth social media engagement related to the watershed council.

    Students received .5 high school course credits in addition to the career-based work skills gained during the internship. To learn more about the Clackamas River Basin Council, as well as ways to get involved and volunteer, visit their website. To learn more about the CREST Internship Pathways Program and how to get involved, please visit the CREST website.

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  • Wilsonville Public Library Provides WLWV Interns With Real-World Photography Experience

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 7/30/2019 2:00:00 PM

    Wilsonville junior Hanna Rizo takes photos at a Wilsonville Library event.

    They say a picture is worth 1,000 words, which is exactly what Wilsonville High School Sophomore Hanna Rizo hopes to achieve with her photography. In fact, storytelling was one of many reasons she was excited to begin a photography internship through the Wilsonville Public Library this summer.

    Hanna has spent her summer vacation photographing various Wilsonville Public Library events, providing marketing materials for the Library while building awareness of the many exciting opportunities it has to offer Wilsonville residents. In addition to experience and work she can add to her portfolio, Hanna will also get the chance to learn from a photography mentor in local photographer Kim Elliott.

    Kim runs a successful photography business in Wilsonville, specializing in both high school senior and family portraits. During Hanna’s summer internship, Kim has provided guidance alongside Wilsonville Public Library staff, teaching Hanna technical skills in addition to important aspects of running a business. Hanna, whose experience lies mostly in photographing landscapes, says her favorite part about photography is telling stories. She was excited to gain experience in event photography and learn skills that will make her a more well-rounded photographer.

    “My goal in photography is always to try to tell the story in one photo,” Hanna said back in early July. “I’m fascinated by the power of photography and the importance it can play in memories. I’m looking forward to learning some technical skills this summer.”

    Through her Wilsonville Public Library internship, Hanna honed camera techniques such as white balancing, color correction, manipulating shutter speed and depth of field in her photos. As is the case with anything, practice and hard work produce gains in photography skills.

    “So much of successful photography is dedication and experimentation,” Kim said. “Preparation and commitment go a long way in producing photography that you can be proud of.”

    In addition to shooting popular community events at the Wilsonville Public Library such as the summer reading program, Red Yarn puppet shows, juggling acts, Presto the Magician, and The Reptile Man, Hanna will also complete a variety of internship assignments. Those assignments are aimed at building career skills, such as interviews of photography professionals, resume building, and career research.

    Her experience working in the Wilsonville Public Library has also allowed her to meet new people and better learn the Wilsonville community. The Wilsonville Public Library provides countless resources and educational opportunities for students and community members alike, which Hanna says she’s enjoyed seeing first-hand this summer. All WLWV interns receive .5 high school credits for their internship work in addition to the many career skills they gain.

    “It was a fun opportunity and I got to attend some great events,” she said.

    To learn more about the Wilsonville Public Library visit their website. For information about Kim Elliott Photography, go to www.kimelliottphotography.com.

    The West Linn-Wilsonville Internship Pathways Program was launched in the summer of 2019, with the goal of connecting high school students to career-based learning opportunities in the local community. For those interested in hosting student interns, or WLWV students interested in participating in an upcoming internship, please visit the CREST Website.

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  • Students Learn About Teamwork, Restoration Efforts Through Metro Native Plant Center Work-Based Learning Program

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 7/9/2019 3:00:00 PM

    Students learn about environmental science from Metro Native Plant Center's Jennifer Wilson.

    The West Linn-Wilsonville Internship Pathways Program launched this summer, connecting WLWV high school students to career-based learning opportunities in the local community. One such work-based opportunity comes through the Metro Native Plant Center, whose collaboration has allowed three students to gain first-hand environmental science experience this summer.

    Through a youth work-based learning program, students have already begun working at Metro’s Native Plant Center in Tualatin, located just down the road from Athey Creek Middle School. Students have hit the ground running, gaining perspective on the vital purpose the Metro Native Plant Center serves in the Metro Region while learning valuable work skills.

    Metro’s Jennifer Wilson led students on Tuesday, July 9, teaching about the various plants currently being grown and their importance to building biodiversity in the Portland Metro area. Students spent time weeding grow-out beds and collecting seeds, which will help maintain and increase native plant populations in local parks and nature preserves, such as Graham Oaks Park in Wilsonville.

    The Metro Native Plant Center focuses much of its efforts on endemic endangered species, aiming to de-list endangered species through plant restoration and ecosystem conservation. Students will receive first-hand experience on everything that goes into that process this summer, completing 30 hours of fieldwork. During that time students will gain valuable skills while learning about potential careers in environmental science.

    Wilson plans to immerse students in the scientific aspects of the Metro Native Plant Center, with plant identification being a major skill that students will engage with. Teamwork and collaboration, meanwhile, are additional skills that students will gain from this summer. According to West Linn High School student Kate VandenBrink, teamwork, in particular, is something she’s already received practice with early on in her work experience.

    “I would say teamwork is something I’m already learning and is something I haven’t gotten from my past work experiences,” Kate says. “It’s something I’ll be able to add to my résumé and use going forward.”

    “Teamwork and collaboration are crucial in this work. We require quite a few volunteers to do what we do and working together is a big part of that,” Wilson says. “You have to be able to work with many people who you might have just met and work together effectively and efficiently.”

    Students will also complete a variety of assignments during their summer work experience, including mentor interviews, writing tasks, résumé building, and more. West Linn High School Student Emily Soose says she is particularly excited to learn more about what it takes to begin a career at a place like the Metro Native Plant Center, and what skills she should be focused on learning in the future.

    “I want to know what (Jennifer’s) career path was like, what her educational path was and what her job entails,” Emily says. “I’m also interested in gardening and sustainability, and am looking forward to improving my gardening skills”

    Similarly, Kate says she’s looking forward to the volunteer aspect of the Metro work experience.

    “My grandmother was a botanist and I’ve grown up learning the importance of giving back to the planet,” she says. “I really want to be a lifelong volunteer and this important experience in learning about opportunities out there. I want to be a benefit to the environment, I don’t want to be part of the problem.”

    Students will receive .5 high school course credits in addition to the career-based work skills they will gain. Students will continue their work experience through the summer, finishing up before the start of the 2019-20 school year. Until then, they’ll soak up all the Metro Native Plant Center has to offer.

    “I’m excited to be able to work outdoors and make a positive impact,” Emily says. “It will be a fun summer.”

    To learn more about the Metro Native Plant Center, as well as ways to get involved and volunteer, visit their website. To learn more about the CREST Internship Pathways Program and how to get involved, please visit the CREST website.

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