Press Releases

  • Calendar Change — School Board Approves Updated 2018-19 School Calendar

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/16/2019 9:00:00 AM

    The West Linn-Wilsonville School Board approved an amendment to the 2018-19 school calendar during a special meeting on Monday, April 16.

    The Oregon Education Association is organizing a statewide day of action planned for May 8 related to insufficient school funding. West Linn-Wilsonville staff recommended the Board make a change to the calendar in response to that possible day of action, as District leaders are unsure how many teachers will participate across the Portland Metro area.

    In order to keep the full allotment of instructional hours intact for students, and maintain a high level of quality teaching and learning when students are in the classroom, the School Board approved three calendar changes involving previously scheduled professional development days.

    Wednesday, April 24 was converted from a Professional Growth Wednesday to a full day of school for all students and schools; Wednesday, May 8, was converted to a full Professional Growth Wednesday, meaning no school for students; and Wednesday, May 22 was converted to a Professional Growth Wednesday with two-hour early release at the primary level only.

    The School Board approved the calendar change on April 16 to give families adequate time to make any necessary adjustments ahead of May 8. All after-school athletic events, as well as AP testing, will continue as normally scheduled on May 8. To view the updated 2018-19 school calendar, visit the About Us section of the district website.

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  • Safety Spotlight — Reunification

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/16/2019 8:00:00 AM

    The West Linn-Wilsonville School District hosted its third joint-safety meeting of the 2018-19 school year on Feb. 13, joining first responders, board members, administrators, First Student bus partners, and others to discuss and practice around the topic of reunification.

    What is Reunification? Reunification is the process of controlled release of students. A reunification may be required if certain emergency events occur at school, such as threats to safety in the form of weapon threats, bomb threats, or building evacuations due to extreme weather, gas leaks, or earthquake situations.

    The school district works in collaboration with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, West Linn Police Department, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, and other community partners in the event of a reunification. Safety agencies use the Standard Reunification Method, which is based on protocols established by the I Love U Guys Foundation.

    Student and Parent Reunification is a protocol that makes the process of student release more predictable and less chaotic for all involved. Because a controlled release is not a typical end of school day event, a reunification may occur at a different location than the school a student attends. This is called an OFF-SITE reunification. The location of an off-site reunification will be announced to parents once students have arrived and the reunification center has been established.

    Notification of a Student and Parent Reunification: In the event that a reunification is required, parents are advised to stay home until receiving communication from the district or law enforcement. This allows law enforcement and first responders to better secure the site prior to a controlled release reunification process. The reunification process will only begin once law enforcement has decided it’s safe to do so.

    Parents will be notified about a reunification process in a number of ways. Parents will receive a broadcast phone message, text alert, and ListServ email, including instructions of what to bring and where the reunification center is. Parents are required to bring ID and will be asked to fill out a reunification form at the reunification site prior to their student’s release. If a parent can not immediately get to the reunification site, a student’s emergency contact may also pick up a student.

    For more information about the reunification process, please watch this instructional video.

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  • Young Scientists Impress at 2019 NWSE ISEF Competition

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/15/2019 3:00:00 PM

    Wilsonville High's Nathan Tidball won first place in the Chemistry category. More than 70 West Linn-Wilsonville high school students and another 30 middle school students competed in the Northwest Science Expo on Friday, April 12 at Portland State University. Dozens of those students received awards and scholarships, serving as tremendous representatives of West Linn-Wilsonville among some of the brightest students from the Pacific Northwest.

    Of note, Wilsonville High Senior Nathan Tidball won first place in the Chemistry category for his project titled "Acrylate Polymerization: Formation of UV Curable Antimicrobial Surfaces"; and West Linn High School's Pooja Jain and Neel Jain won first place in the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering category for their project titled "Skyhound: A low-cost, 3D printed autonomous WiFi tracking search drone to locate missing victims of natural disasters." Dozens of other middle and high school students placed in category competitions and also won special awards. See the full list of award winners.

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  • District Leadership Focuses Data Lens on Improving Student Outcomes

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/10/2019 11:00:00 AM

    Education Northwest's Hella Bel Hadj Amor speaks with District Leadership on April 4.

    Data-driven evidence is a vital component to education in the West Linn-Wilsonville School District. Staff’s use of relevant and significant data to monitor and positively impact student outcomes is pivotal to teaching practices and decision-making processes.

    Tracking important educational data to ensure the success of all students is an equally strong priority for the West Linn-Wilsonville School Board as well. In fact, both the Board and District leadership engaged in powerful professional development around data this past week.

    The School Board focused on just this topic at their most recent work session on April 8, bringing in Oregon School Board Association data expert Renee Sessler, who introduced Iowa Lighthouse data training to help align Board and District priorities and strategies. The Board learned how achievement data is used at the state and local level, honing their understanding of WLWV practices as they gear up for the budget season and the 2019-20 school year.

    The School Board’s first two goals speak to student achievement and the methods in which district staff work towards student success. In particular, Board Goal No. 1 serves as a guiding light throughout the district. The April 8 work session served as an opportunity for the Board to focus on how data is currently being used in the District and how it relates to Board and District Goals.

    District leaders, meanwhile, spent time on April 4 with Education Northwest data experts, working specifically on indicator development to better utilize data in optimizing outcomes for all students. Consisting of building principals and assistant principals, instructional coordinators, district administrators, operations staff, and other district leaders, staff spent the afternoon drilling in on outcomes, indicators, and influencers using real WLWV data. Staff practiced identifying the three criteria in WLWV data, analyzing the many ways in which that data can affect student outcomes, outlining areas where teachers can adjust or improve teaching practices.

    Sorted by school and level, educators focused on indicators unique to the District and individual schools such as attendance and student discipline, and how that indicator data can be used to improve outcomes for student groups. The District has collected meaningful indicator data since 2004, including interim and summative assessment data.

    Building principals and District administration will continue to work with Education Northwest through the school year and beyond to identify indicators at the building level, helping principals to build their school work plans for the coming 2019-20 school year.

    To learn more about the 2017-18 District Work Plan, as well as strategies the District is in engaged in to improve achievement outcomes for all students while eliminating achievement gaps, visit the district website.

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  • Meridian Creek, Wood Middle School Students Prepare for Another Shred Day

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/9/2019 10:00:00 AM

    Students Mia Poppe, Lily Scanlan, and Aric Mistovich are student leaders for Meridian Creek's upcoming Shred Day.

    Shred Day has become a yearly tradition and important part of Wilsonville over the past four years. That tradition will continue once again this year when Meridian Creek and Wood Middle School students host the community event on Saturday, April 20, from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at Academy Mortgage in Wilsonville.

    The event allows any member of the community to shred sensitive documents free of charge in what promises to be a fun environment. Students will be on hand to greet community members, shred documents, and collect donations for school programs and leadership initiatives. It’s an opportunity for seventh-graders to practice leadership skills while giving back to the community.

    “Shred Day is part of our ongoing leadership efforts through our school and our community,” said Meridian Creek seventh-grader Aric Mistovich. “We hosted a ‘No One Eats Alone Day’ and Spirit Week, but this event involves the whole community so we can give back.”

    The event started four years ago when MCMS Math Teacher Kemble Schnell — then a teacher at Wood Middle School — began brainstorming leadership events for her students. A partnership with Advantage Mortgage soon followed and the first Shred Day was born.

    When Meridian Creek Middle School opened for the 2017-18 school year, Ms. Schnell brought the tradition to her new school while including her former Wood students in the fun. The event serves as an opportunity for leadership students from both schools to continue building an inclusive and strong relationship while joining forces for the entire community’s benefit.

    Shred Day also serves as a stepping stone for Meridian Creek Middle School students as they continue to build leadership skills. Students plan to visit nonprofit organizations that create care packages for natural disasters in the coming months so that they can make a global impact in addition to their school and local events.

    “Shred Day is about our local community, but we also want to think globally,” said seventh-grader Lily Scanlan. “We want to help the entire world and show other students that they can get involved in different ways.”

    Leadership also serves as an entry point for students who want to meet new friends in addition to making a positive impact. Seventh-grader Mia Poppe, who is new to Meridian Creek this school year, said leadership opened many doors for her.

    “I wanted a way to get involved in the school and it let me meet a lot of new people and friends,” she said. “I’ve learned a lot and really enjoyed leadership this year.”

    Students are hard at work spreading awareness for Shred Day with their classmates and the larger Wilsonville community. They encourage anyone to attend and take advantage of the free opportunity. The event has been successful in years past, so much so that they filled their truck before the event was scheduled to end.

    Shred Day is Saturday, April 20, from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m at Academy Mortgage; 29100 Town Center Loop W, Wilsonville, OR 97070.

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  • District-wide Middle School Musical Sure to Mesmerize

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 4/3/2019 2:00:00 PM

    Middle School students rehearse for the upcoming Middle School Musical beginning April 11, 2019.

    The annual West Linn-Wilsonville Middle School Musical is back once again, this time with a production of Disney's "High School Musical". Seventh- and eighth-graders from Rosemont Ridge, Wood, Meridian Creek, and Athey Creek Middle School, and consisting of two full casts, have spent the past several weeks preparing for opening night on Thursday, April 11. 

    The Middle School Musical is always popular among students, with more than 100 actors between the district's four middle schools. Each cast — "H Cast" and "M Cast" — will perform three shows each at the West Linn High School Performing Arts Center through April 16. To purchase tickets ahead of time, visit www.tix.com and search "West Linn".

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  • QPR Professional Development Provides WLWV Educators With Important Mental Health Training

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 3/26/2019 9:30:00 AM

    West Linn-Wilsonville Counselors provide QPR training to district staff.

    Professional Development is a hallmark of the West Linn-Wilsonville School District. That professional learning isn’t limited to classroom learning, as educators and administrators regularly partake in social-emotional learning to better serve students. Mental health is a top priority for schools and educators as West Linn-Wilsonville strives to provide the best learning environment possible for students.

    Professional Learning focused on mental health happens regularly in West Linn-Wilsonville, including during Professional Growth Wednesdays. Every Professional Growth Wednesday the district provides QPR training for interested district employees. QPR — which stands for Question, Persuade, Refer — is professional suicide prevention education and training, taught by district staff who are certified in the subject.

    Every month, dozens of district staff participate in training to become QPR Gatekeepers, where certified West Linn-Wilsonville counselors teach wellness promotion, education, and intervention. Many WLWV counselors participate in Clackamas County Suicide Prevention Coalition’s monthly meetings, ensuring professionals are using the best research-based practices.

    With suicide ranking as the second-leading cause of death among Oregonians aged 15-34, mental health is as important as ever. There were more than 47,000 reported suicides in the United States alone in 2017, with suicide rates increasing over the past decade.

    QPR training provides education and prevention training for educators, addressing many myths regarding suicide while teaching how to identify warning signs, intervening with at-risk students or co-workers, and getting necessary resources for those in need. Every month, WLWV staff engage in QPR training, learning about signs and techniques and also working through real-life scenarios.

    Warning signs in students include previous suicide attempt, current talk of suicide, preoccupation with death, depression, substance use, and the recent attempt by a friend or family member. Behavioral clues include giving away prized possessions, increased risk-taking, unexplained anger or aggression, self-destructive acts, chronic truancy, and perfectionism. Situational clues include family problems or alienation, loss of any major relationship, the death of a friend or family member, sudden loss of freedom, or those who are victim to assault or bullying among others.

    QPR Gatekeepers learn how to identify verbal and indirect clues, as well as how to address warning signs to get students and co-workers the help they need.

    QPR training is just one example of professional development and the importance of mental health resources for students. To learn more about QPR, suicide prevention, and resources for students and adults alike, please visit the QPR website at https://qprinstitute.com/.

    Those in immediate need are also encouraged to access the Clackamas County Crisis Line at 503-655-8585, the Youth Crisis Line at 1-877-968-8491. Free mental health and suicide prevention training for those that work or live in the tri-county area is also available at www.gettrainedtohelp.com.

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  • Student Projects Mesmerize at 18th Annual CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 3/8/2019 9:00:00 AM

    West Linn-Wilsonville students showcase projects at the CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium on March 5.

    Nearly 150 projects carefully crafted by some 230 West Linn-Wilsonville high school students lined the walls of the Wilsonville High School gym on Tuesday, March 5. Those projects represented months of dedication and hard work, culminating in the 18th annual CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium.

    Students from West Linn, Wilsonville, and Arts and Technology High School took part in the Symposium, which is part of Intel’s International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). The Intel-ISEF competition inspires the world’s best and brightest young scientists to engage in science exploration, as well as share their own research with the entire science community.

    In addition to awards and prizes, the top 49 projects from the March 5 Symposium advanced to the Northwest Science Expo (the state-level science fair) in Portland this April. Reviewed by more than 30 expert judges, student projects were selected based on a wide-ranging criterion.

    Most noteworthy of the night’s winners were the four “Best of Fair” projects. Those students will advance all the way to the International Intel-ISEF fair in Phoenix, Arizona this coming May, showcasing their research against the top projects from all around the world.

    West Linn High School Senior Pooja Jain and Sophomore Neel Jain were one of four Best of Fair winners for their project: “A low-cost, 3-D printed autonomous WiFi tracking search drone to locate missing victims of natural disasters.”

    West Linn High School Senior Jessica Yu also won for her project titled “A deep learning based drowning detection method for dynamic swimming pool environments;” Wilsonville High School Senior Nathan Tidball won for his project titled “Acrylate polymerization: formation of novel antimicrobial co-polymers;” and West Linn High School Seniors Rashima Mukherjee and Marlee Feltham won for their project titled “A 5th generation CAR T-cell: MicroRNA guided radiogenetics for T-Cell engineering.”

    Aside from the many student recognitions, the night’s awards ceremony was highlighted by the Symposium’s two keynote speakers. West Linn High School Class of 2011 Alumna Claire Offer and Wilsonville High School Class of 2013 Alumna Claire Mallon addressed a standing-room-only crowd of students and families, sharing their own ISEF stories and the high school experiences that prepared them for careers in engineering.

    Offer, an engineer for NASA, working in the Propellants and Life Support division at Kennedy Space Center, shared how ISEF inspired her to explore a career in engineering.

    Mallon, meanwhile, told students the many lessons ISEF taught her on the way to Yale and eventually SpaceX, where she now works in the Components Engineering department.

    Read the full list of participants and award winners.

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  • 142 Student Projects Highlight 18th Annual CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 3/4/2019 8:00:00 AM

    Community members enjoy student projects at the 2018 CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium.

    The West Linn-Wilsonville School District will host the 18th annual CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium on Tuesday, March 5 at Wilsonville High School. Part of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) program, the CREST Jane Goodall Science Symposium allows student researchers to conduct authentic studies in fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and behavioral sciences.

    High School students from across the district will share their work the community starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Wilsonville High School auxiliary gym, followed by two keynote speakers at 7:15 p.m. and an award ceremony at 8:30 p.m. The entire community is invited to attend this free event.

    Students from West Linn, Wilsonville, and Arts and Technology high schools will present a total of 142 projects during the March 5 Symposium. Reviewed by more than 60 expert judges, 49 student projects will be selected to progress to the Intel NW Science Expo on April 12 at Portland State University.

    This year's Symposium is highlighted by two keynote speakers in West Linn High School Alumna Claire Offer and Wilsonville High School alumna Claire Mallon. Offer graduated from West Linn High School in 2011 and is now a chemical engineer working for NASA. Mallon, a 2012 WHS graduate, is a propulsion engineer for SpaceX. The pair of West Linn-Wilsonville standouts will share their journey through science and engineering before presenting category awards, scholarship winners, and the 49 student projects moving on to the state-level fair.

    For more information, please contact ISEF Program Coordinator Dr. Jennifer Wells at WellsJ@wlwv.k12.or.us.

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  • Safety Spotlight — Reunification Process

    Posted by West Linn-Wilsonville on 2/13/2019 2:00:00 PM

    First Responders and district personnel discuss reunification.

    The West Linn-Wilsonville School District hosted its third joint-safety meeting of the 2018-19 school year on Feb. 13, joining first responders, board members, administrators, First Student bus partners, and others to discuss and practice around the topic of reunification.

    What is Reunification? Reunification is the process of controlled release of students. A reunification may be required if certain emergency events occur at a school, such as threats to safety in the form of weapon threats, bomb threats, or building evacuations due to extreme weather or earthquake situations.

    The school district works in collaboration with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, West Linn Police Department, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, and other community partners in the event of reunification. Safety agencies use the Standard Reunification Method, which is based on protocols established by the I Love U Guys Foundation.

    Student and Parent Reunification is a protocol that makes the process of student release more predictable and less chaotic for all involved. Because a controlled release is not a typical end of school day event, a reunification may occur at a different location than the school a student attends depending on the situation. This is called an OFF-SITE reunification. The location of an off-site reunification will be announced to parents once students have arrived and the reunification center has been established.

    Notification of a Student and Parent Reunification: In the event that reunification is required, parents are advised to stay home until receiving communication from the district or law enforcement. This allows law enforcement and first responders to secure the site and ensure safety prior to a controlled release reunification process. The reunification process will only begin once law enforcement has decided it’s safe to do so.

    Parents will be notified about a reunification process in a number of ways. Parents will receive a broadcast phone message, text alert, and ListServ email, including instructions of what to bring and where the reunification center is. Parents are required to bring ID and will be asked to fill out a reunification form at the reunification site prior to their student’s release. If a parent can not immediately get to the reunification site, a student’s emergency contact may also pick up a student.

    For more information about the reunification process, please watch this instructional video.

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Past Press Releases